Information File: Week 6

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Dalston Anatomy

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Dalston Anatomy: This exhibition was one of my favourites that I've been to. The artwork was bright and colourful, showcasing the work of Lorenzo Vitturi. His work focuses on the tensions between photography, installation and sculpture. Dalston Anatomy is a multi-layered exhibition which takes inspiration from Vitturi's local market, Ridley Road in East London. He used fruits and other objects to create intriguing compositions and then used colour to captivate the audience. Colours used were eye catching and gave a joyful mood to all of the work. All of the fruits and objects used in the work were from the market. I found the large rug interesting, which had the common conversations and words written on it from a day to day basis at the market. The installation lifts materials directly from the market stalls, reconfiguring them to create a unique showing space, that also functions as sculptural work in its own right. It takes ordinary objects and foods, then recreates them as exciting pieces which at first do not obviously show the influences of the market. This exhibition gave me inspiration for working with colour and composition of foods. It made me realise that I want to create work that is bold and light-hearted, similar to the pieces in this exhibition.

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Yayoi Kusama

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Yayoi Kusama: This exhibition showcased the work of Yayoi Kusama at the Victoria Miro Gallery. In the back garden on decking was three sculptures named "Pumpkins". They were complimented by silver floating spheres in the pond beside the work. The pumpkins were covered in spots of different sizes which created patterns on the stems and curvatures of the pumpkins. They were gold coloured with black spots and were arranged nicely in the garden so that they had their own space. I found this exhibition quite disappointing because I expected to see more work and we were made to feel quite unwelcome when arriving and leaving the gallery. However, the work that I did see, I enjoyed and I will definitely take inspiration from the varying scale of shapes and the repetition of circles.

Yayoi Kusama is an Avant-Garde sculptor, painter and novelist. She began using polka dots and nets as motifs at the age of around ten, and from there on worked closely with these ideas. In 1994 she started to create open-air sculptures, which she still creates today, such as Pumpkins, which are shown above.

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Pizza Hut Research: For my chosen meal this weekend, I have documented my visit to Pizza Hut. I have chosen to go here for the meal which I will base my prints on because it has recently been refurbished and I would like to record the food as well as the surroundings. I also like the idea of using pizza as a motif and making the prints fun and quite graphic. Whilst at Pizza Hut I took photos (above). I have looked closely at the food and especially the toppings of the pizza because I think I could create interesting prints with all of these different shapes. I could simplify these shapes and make bold prints. I then looked at the objects on the table. These could influence my work by taking shapes from the cutlery, or perhaps using words from the menu to create different print compositions. Finally, I looked at my surroundings which includes the restaurants décor. I really liked the canvas pop art on the walls. This could help me and I could create prints that take influence from this pop art style. Overall, this research has been useful because each aspect will definitely help to develop my design ideas and samples.

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Above: The Pavilion for Japanese Art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art is hosting 'Kimono for a Modern Age' (until October 9th). This is one of a series of eight special exhibitions taking place to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the building, designed by Bruce Goff. The building allows daylight to enter the galleries so that the weather and seasonal variations affect the appearance of the works. A cross-cultural exchange of design ideas between Japan and the West began in the mid 19th Century, fuelled by technological advances in synthetic dyes and manufacturing techniques. By the early Showa period (1926-89) modernist western art movements such as Art Deco and Abstract Expressionism were influencing Japanese fabrics through vibrant and dynamic patterns. This particular pattern could influence my work by using pizza shapes to create this psychedelic design.  Information from - www.lacma.org

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Zandra Rhodes: Above are images of the work of Zandra Rhodes. The first image is from the book 'Zandra Rhodes - A Lifelong Affair With Textiles' from the CSM library. I really like the way that the print expands towards the top of the jacket. This jacket is from 1971 and the print is called "Spiral Shell". The jacket drapes in curves because the underarm seams follow the lines dictated by the print. The base of the jacket is gathered into the contained line of the edge quilting. I could take this print as influence by changing the shapes to relate to pizza and arrange them in a way that is curved like this print. The following three images are from the book 'Textile Design - Zandra Rhodes', also from the CSM library. The print that uses circular shapes is called 'Spiral Flowers'. It's a four coloured discharge print on yellow silk twill, which was displayed in Zandra Rhodes diploma show at the RCA in 1964. The print that uses lightbulbs as a motif is called 'Lightbulb'. It's a paper design and is from 1967. Zandra Rhodes commented on this print and said that there are too many colours for this print to be practical for production. I love her work and would like to take inspiration from these prints. I could take compositions as influence. For example, I could use the Lightbulb piece and use triangular shapes for pizza and repeat them and also overlap them, I could then alternate the colours, similar to this print. (All information is from the two books mentioned).

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Camille Walala: Camille is an artist who works on many different surfaces. From textiles to wall murals, she portrays her distinctive prints with bold colours and geometric shapes. After studying Print Design at university, her career slowly began. To begin with, Camille worked on small scales and sold her prints at markets locally to try to advertise her name. To give even more exposure, she began to paint onto walls in streets of cities then sign them. People recognised this and were intrigued by her colourful, daring work. Bloggers then advertised her work and from these paintings, Camille was offered to paint different buildings and interiors. Since then, she has worked on cafe's, in clubs, the exteriors of shops and even on a woman's house who had asked her to decorate it however she wished! Although working on a larger scale is now her signature style, Camille still creates prints for pillow cushions and other home wear accessories. Her work also includes fashion accessories. She has designed fashion jewellery which was used in a photo shoot with an amazing printed backdrop.  Camille takes great influence from the African Ndebele Tribe's art. She is interested in how the work brightens the spirits of the community and loves the shapes and patterns that they use. After working on a larger scale for the first time, on the interior of the club XOYO in London, Camille realised that she wanted to continue large-scale work. This was after she saw people enjoying the space she had created, and seeing people happy in what she had designed encouraged her to continue making this work on a larger scale.

I love her work because of the clean lines of the prints and the vibrant colours used. I like how she uses clashing colours and makes them work through flowing compositions. I will take inspiration from her work by using bold colours and sharp edges on the shapes that I use. (Information from Camille herself and http://thedesignfiles.net/2014/03/interview-camille-walala/)

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